From the Archives ...

Bridport Report January 2010

By Tom
We decided to head to the coast for a feed of flathead so Bridport was first choice as my father lives there.. free house overnight plus a chance to catch up with the old boy 91 years young.

Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

106 bream head borderPresented from Issue 106, October 2013
The start of daylight savings excites the trout fisher as it signifies the general start to the mayfly season; an insect that causes many a trout angler to become obsessed, chasing that hatch like a moth to a flame. Many anglers who chase trout also target bream but at this time of year, as trout anglers are in such a mayfly-induced trance, thoughts of bream become nullified. For the sneaky bream angler, this is a gift, paving the way for cheeky little solo sessions and all-round good times for you and your mates!

101 bream headPresented from Issue 101

What is it about Bream?

While growing up I had the fortune of spending summer holidays at arguably one of the best bream fishing waters in Australia in Ansons Bay. Being young and eager just to feel the weight of a fish on the rod, catching bream was often derailed by chasing the abundant cocky salmon and silver trevally. While these species were on the chew, getting the buzz out of hooking and landing a fish was too much of a temptation. Often schools of bait fish would be busted up in the bay given away by the tell tail signs of seagulls and terns diving in to pick up the scraps left by the salmon as they slammed the abundant anchovies, or what the locals called “sardines”.

bream scamanderPresented from Issue 99
The annual spawning run or should I say flood of bream to the Scamander River is well underway. Earlier in autumn small schools of adult fish accumulated around the snags in the lower channel of Georges Bay ready for the long run south. When their numbers built up they made the mad dash down the coast and at times could be seen skirting the rocks of St Helens Point as they went.

Along the way they were joined by fish from Dianas Basin and Wrinklers Lagoon when these lagoons were open to the sea. At the same time fish travelled north from Four Mile Creek and Henderson’s Lagoon massing in the surf at the mouth of the river. At the top of the incoming tide fish moved in through the mouth of the river and gathered around the best two snags the Scamander River has to offer- the bridges. Now in late winter, their destinations are the long stretches of brackish water that will provide the right environment for the food their progeny will need after they hatch.

96 bream 01Presented from Issue 96
I don’t think fishing gets any better than watching something come up to the surface and eat a lure off the top. If you’re like me and you love chasing those big Tasmanian bream on lures, then you might have considered casting a surface lure at one time or another. Plenty of people might tell you that “it’s a waste of time”, “black bream don’t like surface lures” or “the water is too cold down here”. Any other number of reasons not to do it might come up. I’m writing this article in the hope that I can disperse that myth and instil confidence in anyone who remains a sceptic. For last three years I have sought out bream on topwater lures in almost every recognised bream estuary, through every month of the year and in every weather condition. You might be surprised to learn that throughout this time I have had very, very few days where I didn’t get at least one fish.

Some days are definitely harder than others but in the end, good things come to those who wait. Hopefully I can pass on some information through this article that will help you in your search for that big topwater bream.

96 bream lagoons bream

Presented from Issue 96
Look and Learn

As I passed Wrinklers lagoon I noticed for the first time this summer the lagoon had been released. The spoil piles still remained where the excavator had dug an opening to the sea, slowly being eroded by the ever widening channel as my favourite lagoon disgorged its tannin rich waters. My mind started racing with questions. How had the high water levels of winter and spring affected the fishing? Would the large bream from the year before still be there? How would the abundance of water birds affect the fishing? As the water level dropped and the flats began to appear, it became evident that the black inky mud of the year before had been overlaid by clean yellow sand and the lagoon now contained far more weed. How would this affect things? There is really only one way to find out.

Presented from Issue 94

With the cold and wet winter days now behind us, as we move into the peak of spring, we can look forward to some truly spectacular fishing ahead.

As Matt Byrne details here, mid-late spring is the prime time to hit our popular coastal estuaries and rivers in search of our iconic sport fishing species – the southern black bream.

Bream on Fly

Tasmanian Bream are a fantastic sports fish that offer the Tasmanian angler a challenging and rewarding day on the water. Black Bream, in Tasmanian waters, have been able to grow to impressive sizes due to the limited angling pressure they receive and the healthy estuary systems they live in. Bream up to 2.5 kg are not uncommon in our waters and these very old fish are often seen and caught amongst schools of bream in the upper tidal reaches of a river during the spawning season. 

NE Breamin" 28/10/2012

We had a magnificent weekend away up the coast with the family and Johnny this weekend just gone. My wife somehow had another weekend off work (which never seems to happen) so I decided to take them away to our block up the bay. We hit the road around mid-morning Saturday and slowly made our way to the magnificent NE Coast. We was in no hurry to arrive, as the plan was to do a spot of Breaming in the afternoon and basically just relax and enjoy the weekend.

East Coast Bream

Feels like years since I have posted a bit of a report, so I thought I would share a couple of recent trips Johnny and I have had to the East Coast chasing a few Bream.
Our first trip was early last week where we decided to head down for a look around to see what the Bream were up to.

You can help bream research

Dr James Haddy.
Do you want to be a recreational research angler? Have you ever wondered how old a bream is?. Been concerned about environmental flows into our estuaries or thought about how climate change might affect fish abundance. If so you might be able to help staff and students from the Australian Maritime College answer these questions by participating in a black bream research project as a recreation research angler.

Sight fishing for bream

by Isaac Harris.
Most of my fishing for bream is done after I see them. Casting to ‘sighted’ fish is the greatest thrill ever! Polaroiding for trout is common enough, but my passion is bream – from the shore. I’m going to explain the highs and techniques of sight fishing in this article.
Being a school kid in Hobart, without a car to tow a boat, restricts me to fishing shore-based or ‘shorebashing’ as many call it, whilst dad (transport) is working. Mostly I fish weekends and holidays or any chance I get really. No matter where I get dropped off, or whatever time, I usually get to see some unbelievable stuff in the good weather, but also the bad.
This article relates mostly to the Derwent River, but applies to similar waters all around Tasmania.

BREAM WANTED

 


 Researchers at the AMC are investigating the influence of environmental later conditions on bream growth and survival. As a recreational fisher we would like you to participate as a recreational research angler.  Next time you go fishing for bream and keep a few, place your frames in a plastic bag with a label stating the date, capture estuary, your name and contact details. 

Mike Stevens and Leroy Tirant Win first Tasmanian Bream Classic for 2010

Round 1 Tasmanian Bream Fishing Classics

After a year off for both Mike Stevens and Leroy Tirant joined up for the first time and came back with a vengance. A well executed plan started with a comprehensive look around Georges Bay on Friday prefish.

James Haddy - the Bream Doctor

Bream'in with passion - by Dan Clifton
Passion for bream? Well if you have ever had the chance to just watch a bream do its thing, you will start to understand why they are the most addictive small fin fish in Australia. Not only are they tough on light gear, they are extremely intelligent and mysterious. Bream, like many species, proffer many questions. It is when you start to search for answers that you start to realise the truth behind the fact that we know more about the moon than we do ocean, and it is in our backyard.

Starlo's breamin essentials

Steve Starling
With several important BREAM Tournaments coming up on the Tasmanian calendar, we figured it was high time to hear from a regular competitor on how he prepares for these events. In addition to being one of the country's most prolific angling journalists and TV presenters, Steve Starling is a high-profile regular in the ABT's National BREAM Series, and a former top-three cash prize money earner on the circuit. He was also NSW Team Captain in 2001 and 2002, NSW BREAM Angler of the Year (AOY) in 2001, NSW AOY runner-up in 2002, Victorian AOY in 2002 and is a dual National BREAM Circuit tournament round winner. So, when Starlo talks about his list of "essential" gear for competing in these events, it pays to listen! Here's what he had to say when we asked him about this important subject:

Unlocking the secrets of bream sex

Dr James Haddy

Dr James Haddy is a lecturer for the Australian Maritime College at Beauty Point. Over the past 10 yrs he has actively researched a variety of aspects of the biology and physiology of black bream. Below is a brief summary of some of his findings on reproduction in black bream.

Understanding the movement patterns of bream

Ryuji Sakabe and Jeremy Lyle

Over the past decade the sporting qualities of black bream have been recognised increasingly amongst Tasmanian anglers, as has the overall quality of the Tasmanian fishery. Unlike mainland states, the commercial sale of bream is prohibited in Tasmania, effectively achieving recreational-only status for the species and avoiding many of the problems of overfishing experienced elsewhere.
In this article PhD student Ryuji Sakabe and Dr Jeremy Lyle of the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute (TAFI) report initial findings of a research project tracking movements of black bream in the Little Swanport Estuary, a popular bream fishing area. This project is part of a wider study of bream ecology and was supported through funding provided by the Fishwise Community Grants scheme.

Six pound trophy bream

Steve Robinson
Damon Sherriff is a great friend of mine. We often speak for hours about fishing. The moon, tide, the barometer, rigs, bait and water temperature. Our wives don't understand and never will.

Targeting Bream with Soft Plastics

Introduction
In the last ten years or so, the humble bream has turned from a bread and butter species that was predominantly targeted by anglers using baits such as shrimp, prawns, crabs, bass yabbies/nippers, blood worms, sand worms, etc, into a highly prized sports fish that is now being targeted with great success by anglers using lure and fly.

Bream Fishing with Squidgies

Local Tasmanians don't realise how good their bream fishery is. It is a fishery that has changed little over many years and in fact recent reports have confirmed in some places it is getting better. I am not sure when commercial fishing stopped for bream, but it has been many, many years.

Bushy the Bream Buster


The bream on lures thing certainly seems to have captured the imagination of anglers on a national scale. I know I am completely sucked in and I know why.  For a start bream are still around in reasonable numbers, you can very often actually watch as they strike or refuse a lure, and they provide a lively fight.  The final clincher is that they are tricky to catch - they react to different lures in different habitats and they require a bit of angler finesse to catch consistently.  Catching bream on lures is a whole different ball game to catching them on bait and I think it is going to eventually be huge in this country. I have only spent a couple of hours in Tassie chasing bream with borrowed gear and lures but I suspect that with a bit of mainstream interest this is going to explode into a big aspect of the sport of Tassie fishing.  Okay, if you are going to try it you need to set yourself up with some effective gear and a few basic techniques to get you off to a successful start.

Bushy's Bream Techniques

Georges Bay Bream.

It was Friday 9th March, the day before the start of the St Helens Classic game fishing competition, and those of us with fish fever were in the town early preparing for the big day.
I went around to Rocky and Angela Carosi's place to see who had been catching what -and hopefully where, only to find Kaj Busch (or Bushy as he is better known) hanging over Rocky's gate contemplating the view over the bay, "come back to Tassie to chase a few smutting mako's eh Bushy?', I politely enquired referring to last year when we presented him with a 2 kilo fly we fondly called "the emerging muttonbird'.

Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com