From the Archives ...

The Lowland Rise

Mark Salisbury

Tassie fly fishers and regular "blow-ins" like myself will remember the 2006-7 Tasmanian trout season for the late season dry fly bonanza that took place on the lowland rivers in the northern midlands. The only thing preventing the fish from rising every day was inclement weather and even then a few fish could usually be picked up by visiting notorious insect hatching "hot spots'.
Some of the hatches were immense and the dry fly fishing was outstanding. Every single fish we caught during March and April was stalked, seen or ambushed. On certain days the fish were working themselves into a feeding frenzy likened to the spectacle of bronze whalers rounding up pilchards in the surf. We couldn't even reel in our fly lines without fish slashing and smashing dry flies as they skidded and waked across the surface. The late season fly fishing in northern Tasmania completely eclipsed the early and mid-season's sport.

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Presented from Issue 97
The opening of the 2011/ 2012 trout fishing season had many anglers excited, rainfall had consistently inundated the state for months prior, and our inland catchments realised levels not witnessed for many years. That being said, the overall condition of many fish landed in the central highlands disappointed anglers, Arthurs Lake and Great Lake being two of the biggest offenders when it came to not “reaching expectations”. One Central Plateau fishery that seems to have bucked the trend this season was Lake King William, where if anything, the average size and condition of its inhabitants has increased quite dramatically. Todd Lambert, John Cleary and Mike Stevens recently took a trip up there to see if the rumours were true.

Lake King William open for fishing all year round

Whilst previously open to all year round fishing until 2006, Lake King William has only been open during the brown trout season for the past six years. At the request of angling groups the lake is again open to all year round fishing. The regulation changes in order for this to occur have been passed and the lake is now open to fishing during this winter. This gives anglers an opportunity to fish the highlands during the winter period.

Lake King William 3/11/2102

Dale Howard and I organised to head up to Lake King William yesterday. I dared not back out of this trip as I let him down at the last minute on his previous excursion to the Swan River. I also didn’t want the name “big girlie man” to gain momentum.

Laughing Jack & King William Report 27/03/2012

We headed out to Lake King William 27 March, with Dale and Trev Howard, leaving home at 6.30am. On the way, and since we were going past it, we thought we would have a look at Laughing Jack Lagoon as we had never been there before.

Lake King William Report 13/3/2012

John Cleary, Mike Stevens and I headed out to Lake King William yesterday, doing "research" on this water for the next edition of Tas Fishing and Boating News. What an underutilised and hidden gem this place is. I cannot wait to head back there again.

Great Lake and Lake King William Report 2011-02

Went up to Great Lake on Friday afternoon with Glen, young Jack and Bailey. Fished in Canal Bay and we managed three nice browns, I managed two on emergers and young Jack got one trolling. He lost three as well. South westerly breeze and quite cool, we saw a few taking gum beetles off the top, but things generally a bit tough.

Lake King William

Although King William trout are small, many anglers find the high catch-rate to be very appealing. The lake is also one of the few trout waters open to year-round sport, though fishing in winter can hardly be recommended.

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